6 Things To Look For In A New Hire

6 Things To Look For In A New Hire


When recruiting for your organisation, there are a number of factors which should be taken into consideration during the process. Recruitment is a difficult process at the best of times and you can never be certain that the person is being their true self during the interview. There are however some key attributes to look for in a new hire, and if a candidate possesses the majority of them, then you may just have a winner. 

 

  1.     Great communication skills
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Skill in both written and verbal communication is one of the first attributes you should look for in a new hire. Regardless of which role you are recruiting for, the ability to communicate well and with ease is a fantastic asset to have. It helps in not only the day-to-day operation of the role, it also contributes to team dynamics in the workplace. Someone with a friendly attitude and positive communication skills will be easier to work with, and is also likely to be a more proactive team member.

 

 

  1.     Attitude
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A great attitude is crucial in a new hire – this includes not only enthusiasm, but also passion, determination and perseverance. The candidate has to demonstrate that they really want the job, they are eager to work for the organisation, and determined to succeed. For example, someone who keeps applying for the job over a long period of time shows that they really want to work for that organisation. Someone who has done their research on the organisation, shows that they are eager and determined to get the position. A great attitude throughout the recruitment process is likely to mean a great attitude in the workplace – something every manager should look for in a new hire.

 

 

  1.     Ability to provide examples
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It is fantastic if the candidate has worked in a similar role for a year, but can they describe how they handled particular situations by providing an example? Structuring questions that require the candidate to explain with an example is a fantastic way to gage whether they have truly have the right experience or not. If they are unable to provide specific examples, they may be a little less experienced than they claimed they were.

 

 

  1.     Integrity
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Whether you are a cleaner or the CEO of a company, integrity is essential in every role. Integrity encompasses several components, including honesty and punctuality. If the candidate isn’t able to be honest in the recruitment process, how can you expect them to make honest judgements in the role? If the role requires analysis, you want to know that the candidate will tell you both the good and the bad news. Integrity ensures you’re getting the most out of the person, and that the person is the right fit for your organisation.

 

 

  1.     A good fit culturally
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Although culture is often overlooked, it is most certainly something that you should look for in a new hire. Workplace culture is more important than you think – we spend most of our time at work, so if we are uncomfortable within the environment, we are likely to look for other employment options. If employees do not fit in your company culture, there is a higher chance that they will not work well in the team; leading to a higher conflict rate and a loss of interest in your company.

 

 

  1.     Long term potential
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With the cost of turnover being high, and the investment of training new staff being equally as costly, it is in your best interest to look for longevity in a new hire. You must ask the candidate what their future plans are, where they see themselves in several years time, and how they see themselves growing within the organisation. If they give you a coherent answer, this means that they have thought about their future within the organisation.

What do you think?
Can you think of any further attributes that are important to look for in a new hire? Leave me a comment to share your views – I’d love to hear if there are any I can add to the list.

This article was written by Laura Hutton on behalf of the Australian Institute of Business. All opinions are that of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of AIB. 

 

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