The Diverse AIB Alumni Network

The Diverse AIB Alumni Network


When students choose the Australian Institute of Business (AIB) for their business degree, they join a global network of over 16,000 students, alumni, academics and industry experts from over 90 countries. The AIB reputation is recognised on a global scale, ensuring that students can achieve real results no matter where in the world their career takes them.

To help paint an up-to-date picture of alumni demographics, achievements and sentiments, we undertook an extensive survey of MBA alumni this year. The survey found that students and graduates are spread across all age groups, career stages and industries. To learn more about the diversity of the AIB alumni community, read on.

A global community

With 43% of MBA alumni located in Australia, and 57% overseas, there’s no doubt that the AIB alumni network is a truly diverse community. When students begin their study with AIB, they unlock access to a range of opportunities for professional development, networking events, and the ability to connect through online groups and forums. It’s this global networking opportunity that many graduates highlight as a key benefit of the AIB MBA, as they are able to establish relationships across industries on an international level. Whether it’s local or international opportunities that a student is seeking, the diverse backgrounds of the AIB alumni will ensure there is scope for both.

Representing a diverse range of industries

When AIB MBA graduate Jimmy Bangun discussed the highlights of his degree, networking was high on his list. He said, “Through this MBA journey I’ve met a lot of different people outside of my industry. I think that’s the value of an online MBA – you’re not just stuck in one city, one town and the same people – you can make valuable contacts overseas and across industry as well.” The 2017 AIB Alumni Insights Report highlighted that AIB alumni are employed across a whole range of industries, with no one industry possessing a majority. In fact, 12.6% was the largest share, which represented Business & Commerce. Following closely behind was Manufacturing Transport (11.4%), Banking & Finance (10.4%), Healthcare (8.8%), and Government & Defence (8.6%). Other industries represented in the AIB alumni include IT & High Tech, Mining & Energy, Education & Training, Property Development, Science & Engineering, Consumer Products and Consulting & Strategy. Interestingly, 22.4% of these graduates changed industry since starting their MBA, using the programme to help drive the change they desired.

Impressive career achievements 

According to the 2017 AIB Alumni Insights Report, 22.9% of alumni own their own business. In addition to that, a further 20% reported working for a Fortune 500 or ASX 200 company, with big names such as Woolworths, Qantas Airways, Commonwealth Bank and Rio Tinto being listed as employers. When it comes to earnings, the average annual income of alumni was $136,800, with 90% possessing more than 10 years’ experience in the workforce. When it comes to levels and roles, 83.3% of respondents are in managerial positions, with 5% being c-suite executives. AIB alumni are clearly of a high calibre, with a majority of graduates achieving significant goals in their career. Many approached the MBA with a senior position, however post MBA are promoted even further – 34% of 2016 and 2017 alumni gained a promotion within 12 months of graduating.

What do you think?

With 81.1% of survey respondents agreeing that the AIB MBA has enabled them to realise their goals, it’s clear the MBA can have a profound effect on career growth. AIB truly has a diverse and global alumni network, contributing to the wealth of experiences enjoyed throughout the MBA. I’m keen to hear from current students and alumni to learn of their experiences – what have you gained from joining such a community?

This article was written by Laura Hutton on behalf of the Australian Institute of Business. All opinions are that of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of AIB.  

 

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